Business Ethics with Laylee Emadi

Are you considering launching or even investing in something new for your business? IN the creative industry, there is no regulation on the education that’s made available online, which means we’re often left to decide what’s worth the investment on our own. In today’s episode, Laylee Emadi of the Creative Educator Academy joins us to chat about the importance of business ethics. Listen in as she shares some of the ethical issues she’s seen in the industry, how to make investments in ethical products, and ways you can ensure your business and the industry are being ethical!

This is Season 2 Episode 6 of Here’s the Tea with Akua

Here’s the Tea with Akua is a safe space to learn about hot topics, gain a new perspective and have a greater understanding of the people around us. You’ll hear amazing stories of everyday people like you and me. They’ll be spilling the tea and giving us an honest look into their lives. As we discuss topics such as race, relationships, mental health, and how to just figure out the thing called life, we’d love to have you subscribe on Apple PodcastSpotify, or your favorite podcast player!

Meet Laylee:

Laylee is an educator, podcast host, and photographer with a heart for serving clients and fellow creatives. She believes in serving the creative industry with heartfelt encouragement, honest advice, and a shared pursuit of the ever-elusive “balance.” As a former high school teacher, Laylee has a heart for educating others. Her goal is to help you feel confident in your ability to make a difference, create impact, and to build a life doing what you love.

Important Parts of the Conversation:

Get to Know Laylee (1:56)

Business Ethics (3:06)

Issues in the Creative Industry (5:49)

Ethics at Conferences (11:22)

Speakers Approaching Conferences for Diversity (15:41)

Key Thoughts to Make Good Investments (18:03)

Asking for Reviews (22:28)

Two Tips (24:08)

Encouragement (29:16)

 

Mentioned in this Episode:

Stuck Between Two Worlds Episode

The Creative Educator Academy

So, Here’s the Thing with Laylee Emadi – Akua’s Episode

 

Connect with Laylee:

https://layleeemadi.com/

https://www.instagram.com/laylee_emadi/

 

Subscribe to the Podcast:

Apple Podcast

Spotify

 

Business Ethics with Laylee Emadi

Review the Transcript:

Akua Konadu
Welcome to here’s the tea with Akua. That’s me, and this is a place where we have candid conversations about various hot topics. Each week, you’ll be hearing some amazing stories of everyday people like you and me, there’ll be spilling the tea and giving us an honest look into their lives. I believe that our stories are powerful, and when shared, they can change not only our perspectives, but also our lives. No topic is off limits. So have a seat and get ready because we are going to be making uncomfortable conversations comfortable.

Akua Konadu
Hey, everyone, welcome back to another episode of here’s a tea with Akua. And I am super excited for this conversation as I am for every single conversation. So today, this episode, we’re gonna get a little bit shady. And I am more than okay with that. Because everyone have my friend here, who’s back for another episode, Laylee Emadi. And we are going to be talking about business ethics. So if you are an entrepreneur, a business owner, or you would like to be one, this episode is for you, because we’re going to be getting down to the, to the nitty gritty of just some of the gaps that we’re seeing in the creative industry. So hello, Laylee Hello, thanks

Laylee Emadi
for having me back.

Akua Konadu
Yes, thank you so much for being here. I’m super, super excited. And if y’all have not checked out the episode that Lily was on from season one, it was so good. It was called stuck between two worlds growing up first generation. And that was just such a really, really fun episodes where you can get to know her on a different level. And also to same thing with tonight. So want to put that plug in there, because that episode was so much fun. So I’m so glad that you are back here. So for people if you’re new listening lelee Why don’t you share who you are, what it is that you do and how you’re making your impact in the world. Oh, gosh,

Laylee Emadi
okay. Hi, I’m Laylee. And I am a business coach and strategist for creative entrepreneurs, but specifically for creative educators. So think of course creators, speakers, mentors, and coaches, people who host group coaching, all those kinds of things. I help them kind of learn how to teach and how to lead in a really ethical way. And so that’s why I’m really excited to be here talking about business ethics, because I could talk about it for days and yeah, we might get a little. I mean, would we call it shady or will we just call it keeping it real? I don’t know. But either way I’m I’m really excited to kind of spill the tea on it with you my

Akua Konadu
friend. Yes, yes, girl. I mean, will I be shady Hell yeah, I can’t even denies that. And I’m just glad I get to do with my friend. So let’s kind of just like dive in. Also to sidenote, y’all lately is my business coach. And this woman has absolutely transformed my business in the last year. So if you are looking for any type of guidance, like she is your go to so had to put that in there. But let’s talk about what are business ethics? Like what does that mean to you?

Laylee Emadi
Yeah, so first of all, thanks. That was mean, I’m gonna cry. Brief crying break. Yeah, so business ethics, this is ethics to me is really just like, at the heart of it. Are you running your business? With high morals? Are you making sure that you are being conscientious of what’s right and wrong, and prioritizing that over, you know, making a quick buck or trying to be profitable, there’s obviously we want to be profitable, that’s my job is to help people make a profit, but never at the expense of doing the right thing, never at the expense of letting go of our morals, right. So, to me, business ethics is just making sure that every decision that you make inside of your business, every single step that you take forward in your business is rooted in the ethics that you are comfortable with as a human being first. And then as you know, wanting to grow your business second. And so I think that, truly, that’s really it’s important to me in all aspects. But it’s even more important to me as an educator in the creative industry, because it’s kind of where the root of my signature course and program the creative educator Academy came about, I saw so many unethical things happening in the creative industry from other elite like quote unquote, leaders, self, you know, self titled leaders and educators that were unethical and super shady. And I was not about that life. And I really wanted to provide education for people who wanted to lead an ethical and moral way. So that’s my ramble on it. But that’s kind of what it means to me and why it’s important to me.

Akua Konadu
I love that because as somebody you know, you’ve been in business a while and you know, I’m only I think you’re three. And so there was a lot that I just have, like, when you’re first starting out, there’s just a lot that you don’t see and you also kind of view it as like, kind of almost a naive sense as well like You know, you assume that everybody’s the same way as you are and believes the same thing as you do like values the same thing such as, like being honest. And, you know, of course, we’re all in the business to make money. But of course, like I like to look at the service that I provide is like I’m making a positive impact in somebody’s life beyond dollars, how am I able to help change their life with what it is that I do? And not everybody is in that for that same reason. And so I think last year, I think 2020, for me, and I’m sure other people to really highlighted a lot of issues and gaps that I’ve seen in the creative industry that, honestly is not talked about very often. I think if it his talked about, it’s amongst people that you know, and trust, but I don’t think it’s ever really shared. So what are some issues that you are seeing with how long you’ve been in business? Like, what are some of the issues that you’re seeing in the creative industry?

Laylee Emadi
Oh, gosh, I feel like I there’s like a million things I could list. But I mean, to your point, it definitely the years add up, but the issues don’t really change, they just kind of have, in my opinion, they’ve just kind of exploded and become higher in numbers. So like, you know, when I was I’m 10 years, and now I’m in like going, I’m in my 10th year, and the first few years, I would see things like, oh, this person is hosting a workshop, but they don’t really know what they’re doing. And they’re making all these grand promises, not delivering on them. And then the attendees are really upset about it, because they’ve invested their money in it, and they’re not seeing a return. Right. So that’s like a small example from what’s like seven or eight years ago. Well, now ever since course, creation, digital products, you know, quote, unquote, passive income have become so big and so talked about and obviously appealing for many reasons. And again, I just disclaimer here, for anybody listening, I teach on these things, I believe in these things. And I think what they’re done, right, they’re amazing. But so many people are really just selling the dream. And they don’t have like, the knowledge, the expertise, the, again, the ethics to back it up. And so people are buying courses on how to make courses and, you know, products on how to make products, but they’re really empty, and they’re not getting what they’re paying for. And so they’re then they’re not able to create good products, and the cycle continues. So anytime you walk into something, and you see like, oh, this person just charged me $1,000 For something, I didn’t actually walk away learning anything, but their job looks pretty easy. And then you think to yourself as a human like, maybe I’m gonna do that. And then you start selling things for $1,000. And none of your students and none of the people who are paying you are learning anything. So that vicious cycle of like, unethical behavior continues. So I guess that’s what I that’s what I mean by like, the problems are the same as they’ve been in the past. But since everything has become so digital heavy, because of the pandemic, and because of the past couple of yours, now we’re just seeing them become exponentially higher. And now people are starting to wake up to the fact that like, all these unethical things are happening. And it’s making it like a million times harder for the ethical educators and the ethical people creating good quality stuff, to have their their stuff be seen and purchased. It’s just like, the worst possible cycle when you act unethically. Because like I said, it just feeds into itself and it grows and it like stacks on itself. It’s kind of crazy.

Akua Konadu
It really is because also to just kind of been having conversations with other entrepreneurs in the industry. Like, I like I said, for me, I didn’t start seeing some of the issues until 2020. But to your point, like a lot of these things were already happening even with courses but also to with masterminds, where you’re asking people to drop 1000s of dollars, and you the person who’s running it or hosting it is giving beyond mediocre type of content, where like, again, like I feel like I’m being shady for saying this, but I’m being shady for saying this sorry. But I feel like sometimes you see these really big names and like they’ve built these amazing businesses, which is awesome, cool. But they will charge a lot of money for content that is extremely mediocre. Like I feel like mediocrity is absolutely celebrating the creative industry. And I feel like sometimes some of us ethical ones, we have to work twice as hard and what what we’re actually providing is value like what we’re helping actually change people’s lives. And we have to work twice as hard to get there. I don’t know, what are your thoughts on that? Because I feel like that’s what I’ve seen.

Laylee Emadi
No, I mean, I agree. I think that I’m also like to be blind. I’ve wasted probably about 15 to $20,000 on mediocre education that I will never see a return on investment. Like I may be able to pull I’m one of those people that like I like to see the silver lining and I like to say okay, there’s a learning experience and everything I do so if I pay $10,000 for something that claims it’s a group coach program but it’s really just like a glorified overhyped DIY course, that’s not even that good to begin with. That was a little shady, but it’s true. You know, that’s literally what I did was and what I spent and what I got. And I’m able to walk out of that with like, I’d say, probably like a $2,000 ROI on a $10,000 investment. Does that suck? Yes. But that’s to your point. I mean, that’s just kind of like, my bad I fell for it. I’m learning my lesson. And I have to be more discerning of who I work with.

Akua Konadu
Yes, I think that’s such a good point. And if that’s been you, like, if you’re an entrepreneur, and you have like, I have also wasted money as well, I have invested 1000s into specific things. And I didn’t get a lot of return on it, which, again, like it was the material that was provided. For me that wasn’t that great. So this is why I like love working with you lately, why I’ve stuck with you. Because it has truly been like the quality of education and how you truly put people first, like it really does show up. Like, it’s it’s so important. And I think for me, that just inspires me to continuously be more like just my morals and my ethics to make sure to put that in the forefront. And so not only just with that, those pieces that we’ve talked about, like some of the gaps that we’ve seen in the industry, but let’s talk about even conferences, because I think for me, that’s where I started to see a lot of gaps really huge gaps, especially in regards to diversity, equity, inclusion and inclusion, like what are some of your thoughts with that?

Laylee Emadi
have so many thoughts, always. So first conferences as a whole? I mean, we’re seeing two there are two problems, I think we should address like in this conversation, one is definitely Di. But also the other that I want to talk about, that you’re probably seeing too is that lack of quality. And the why is there a lack of quality in conference speakers. And I think that there’s a few reasons for this one, I think a lot of conference hosts in the creative industry have been taught, like, you don’t have to pay your speakers, you don’t have to invest in good speakers, you don’t have to pay for their, you know, travel and put them up because they’re so excited, these creatives are so excited to speak that they’ll do it for free, and they’ll pay to do it, and they’ll lose money to do it. And while I think that there’s an exception to every rule, and there are definitely like times where that’s worth it to people, and at times where it’s been worth it to me, I do think if you’re staffing a full conference of 20 speakers, and none of them are professional speakers, they’re all just professionals who might want to speak, you’re gonna see a lack of quality, right, you’re gonna see like a drop off of quality. And so yeah, if you’re sitting in a ballroom listening to 20 speakers who are just like, just kind of okay, at at the job of speaking, maybe they have the knowledge, but they don’t know how to communicate it. Of course, you’re going to feel like you’ve kind of been ripped off a little bit like, that makes sense. And then the second thing is, of course, a lack of diversity, equity and inclusion. I mean, I think that the fact that we saw, and I may be speaking out of turn, but I would love to hear like your thoughts on this, too. I feel like we saw this huge, promising uptick. And actually your episode on my podcast about diversity. You said it right then and there, you said, this has to be an ongoing thing. This can’t be a 2020 thing. Well, lo and behold, we’re in 2022, and half of the graphics that I see for speakers have zero people of color, or any kind of diversity being shown. I’m not even just talking black and white. I’m talking every type of, of diversity possible. None of it. It’s just all one color. And I and all one type. And I It blows my mind. I’m like, what happened in 2020? Did you guys forget? Did we not just live through the same two

Akua Konadu
years? No, agreed, like that’s the thing right now that I’m seeing with conferences is still right. So even if they are being diversed, there’s still a form of tokenism that’s happening. Still, I think a lot of times where I got a lot of the speaking opportunities that I feel like I got last year could have potentially been not every single one. So yeah, I’m not making it seem like there were some really great conference that I spoke at that I loved and I enjoyed, and they treated everybody so well. But some of them I do feel like it was because just because I was African American, like it had nothing to do with the skills that I brought to the table. They just needed a black face, right. And the thing is that I’m noticing is that a lot of the conferences, not all of them, but some of the ones that I’m seeing are diverse, but they lack inclusivity which those two things are used interchangeably all the time, but you can be diverse but not inclusive. Right. They are two separate things. And I feel like a lot of these conferences, they’re being diverse just to be diverse, but they’re not doing that and like they’ll stop right there. They’re not taking the extra step to be inclusive, which that means like all of the shit that you’re doing isn’t even genuine, which is extremely frustrating. And then we go and how to 2022 where you still see lineups where it is literally all one specific type of people, and I’m very confused. I’m just like, when exactly to your point? Have we not lived the last the past two years? What did we see? And the fact that people are still choosing to exclude others? Because they don’t want to take the extra step? And if and if anything, and if they are being diverse, it’s always the same small group of people of color that you see in every single conference. What are you doing to take that extra step to find new people, like, people that are different than you and everything? Like not the typical same group of small people of color that you know, because it’s just easy, right? Like, how are you stepping out to find other speakers of color or speakers from marginalized communities? So that’s my take on that.

Laylee Emadi
Yeah, absolutely. And I think I mean, I will say, again, like silver lining I’m seeing because I, because of my job, because I work so closely with with speakers in the industry, I’m seeing a lot of speakers come to me and say, Hey, I got asked to speak at this event, they did not release the speaker lineup to me in advance. Now the speaker lineup is public, and I see the lack of diversity, and I’m mad about it. And then they I’m so proud to say that like my students in particular, and my peers and my friends, they come to me and say, like, Hey, what should I say? Like, I’m going to say something. And I’m going to advocate for this. And I will say, that’s like a beautiful thing to have seen. But it shouldn’t be that way, like the conference was should have already prevented that from happening. You shouldn’t be putting that onto your speakers. But how great is it to see that kind of ally ship? Like I was really proud of that, but also disheartened that it had to have been done in the first place.

Akua Konadu
Oh, yeah. I mean, I think that is very hopeful to hear that that there are people who have taken what they’ve learned from 2020. And they care and that they’re reaching out to the necessary people to help figure out how that can they equip themselves. So that number one, they can make sure that they’re doing their part, which, which I love, and I’m just gonna be shady. If you are a person that host a conference. And you are still doing this shit respectfully, You seriously need to do better actually, disrespectfully do better. That’s just where I’m at. Because I feel like number one, things are shifting in the creative industry. I think, you know, we’ve had this conversation several times, I think things are evolving. And I think people are looking for a new wave of people who are here to do right by their audiences and the community. And y’all I don’t want to make it seem like the creative industry is just as trashy as place. It’s not it’s an amazing place. I’ve made amazing, met amazing people, amazing communities have amazing opportunities, but we just want to showcase like, there’s still like some hard pieces that still need to be worked through. And like we need to be having these conversations because they’re just not being had. So lately, a question for you is, when we are out here as business owners, and we you know, whether it be a speaking event, or you know, whether we want to work with a coach or buy your course, like what are some important key things that we need to be asking ourselves to make sure that we’re making the right decisions for our business?

Laylee Emadi
That’s a great question. I feel like there’s a few things that you can run your like run through before making any kind of investment. One is seeing like, is the social proof that they’re sharing like, are the testimonials that they’re sharing, actual people that you can find and see, especially on social media, I feel like we just see like testimonial after testimonial, and then dig a little bit deeper. I am really guilty of this. Like, I still buy courses, I still buy I believe very firmly in education. Like you said, I’m not out here to bash the creative industry. Obviously, my job is to create educators inside the creative industry. So like, my job revolves around doing this one thing really well. But something that I have not done in the past as a consumer is I know this sounds really stupid, but just Google it, like I go through Instagram, I’ll go through their website, but I don’t like look for reviews. Well, if I have like that, one example I gave I spent upwards of nine almost $10,000 on this one thing that was not what it claimed to be, when I was unhappy with it is when I went to Google just to see if anybody else had had a similar experience. Well guess you had like four blog posts written about it. Like if I had, if I had done that first. I maybe could have saved myself a little bit of heartache. But that’s, you know, one thing is just like do your due diligence, do dig a little bit deeper. You know, make sure that the stuff that’s out there is actually proven make sure that the results that they’re saying they can get you make sure that they’ve gotten it for somebody else. ask as many questions as you want these people who are selling to you and by these people, I mean me like I have courses, I have digital products. I have education that I sell. If I want to sell something to somebody, I am open for questions, guys. Like don’t feel like you can’t ask questions to the people who are selling to you just because they’re the experts and just because their face and their name is on Sunday. Don’t you think I don’t want to bother them? I’m just gonna buy it or I’m not, you know, ask your questions. It depends on what they’re selling. But how many people who have taken this have actually, like found a transformation? You know, find the question that you’re comfortable with and ask it. Don’t be, don’t be afraid to question somebody’s products before you buy them.

Akua Konadu
I think that’s such a good point, just asking questions. Sorry, go on.

Laylee Emadi
And then the last thing, I think, is always a good practice before before you purchase anything, if it’s high level. So I know you mentioned coaches, when I do one on one coaching with people, there are a lot of people who book straight out. And same with the mastermind. Because I feel like I do a pretty good job of like, what you see is what you get, what I put out on social media and on the internet is who I am in real life. But if somebody doesn’t know me, they probably want to have a one on one call with me. And a discovery call, like an interest Call of 10 minutes, I’m gonna give that to somebody, if it’s a high level, like, I won’t give it to somebody, maybe that would just want to buy like a very inexpensive product. Just because I if I did that to everybody, I would have no time in the day. But if somebody wants to dedicate one on one coaching with me, that’s a high ticket, that’s a high price, and they deliver on that high price, I know that I can get my students a return on investment on that. It’s been proven in my business, and with the people that I work with, if they do what I tell them to do, they will likely see a return can never have 100% guarantee, but I feel confident in that. So I’m gonna get on a call with them. If somebody is unwilling to get on a call with you, I would just move on. Surely, if you’re if they’re asking you for a high ticket investment, so I’m talking upwards of like $5,000, even 2000, even any 1000s of dollars, if somebody’s asking for that, if they’re not willing to give you a few minutes of their time, I wouldn’t invest in them. That’s just my personal preference. And again, I might be throwing a little bit of shade. But I’m comfortable with that.

Akua Konadu
If y’all could only see her face right now, when she said that, like she,

Laylee Emadi
like, I’m more than comfortable with that. So I can sleep at night. I can sleep at night with that fact, you

Akua Konadu
know what I mean? Yes. Oh, that’s so helpful. And yeah, I think just to your point, like, don’t be afraid to ask questions. Also to is gonna say, How would you feel? Or is this weird? Because I want to know your thoughts on this? What about like, if you see the testimonies of the people who actually like took the course or whatever, or purchase that product? Is it weird to reach out to them to ask what their thoughts are?

Laylee Emadi
Or no, I don’t think it’s weird. I think it depends on if you’ve ever like interacted with them before, if they seem like they’re open to that I don’t like to like hop into just anybody’s you know, inbox or DMS or whatever. But if if they’ve put it out there, if there’s especially if they’re sharing about it, I always ask questions. So like, I’ve seen in the past, I’ve had friends who have taken other people’s courses, and I’m like, Hey, I saw your I knew them in advance. Like I knew them beforehand. And they’d be like, Hey, I saw you took so and so’s group coaching program, like what was your experience if you don’t mind sharing? And then they’ll share with me because we already knew each other. I don’t think I’ve ever asked like a Rando VM as like a random person. But that’s not to say wouldn’t, especially if that random person was like doing an affiliate thing for the program, or just like sharing about it on their own, I’d be like, Hey, I saw you shared about this, because that opens the door.

Akua Konadu
Okay, no, that’s actually really helpful. Because I’ve always been curious about that. Like, I’ve never done that. But I’ve always been like, oh, I kind of want to ask this person. But to your point, I think it’s a lot easier if you have like a relationship with them, or whatever. And so do you have any advice as like for us, like, who are creating products or creating these services, because I know for when I was creating my service, you told me like a cool, you have to beta test like, which I was like, I don’t want to do this. Like I don’t have time. But the fact that I did that, I feel so confident now in what I offer and the results that I can bring. So that was one of ladies tips that she shared with me that now I’m like a firm believer in but do you have any other tips for like any of us business owners who are creating our products or services, how to make sure that we are being ethical?

Laylee Emadi
Yeah, I have so many of those. I’m gonna give you two, I’ll give you one thing not to do. And again, I go, Gosh, I hate to throw shade this much in one episode, but here we go. Because I gotta be able to sleep at night. You know what I mean? Do not buy anything that tells you buy this and you’ll be able to create and sell your course in three days. Two days, four days a weekend a week? No, absolutely not. If you can create something in two days and sell it, I don’t want to buy it. Period. I’m not going to buy it.

Akua Konadu
Did the person honestly make it in two days? So I highly doubt that. No,

Laylee Emadi
because here’s what they’re Simon tell you right now. Spoiler alert. This is what they sell. All you need is a concept pre sell it, pre sell it. They’re basically saying You can create it as you go. And a lot of people believe this, I know that there are going to be people be people listening to this who are like, wow, really is really just shitting all over my dreams right now. But a lot of people sell this. Because people who sell about building courses, they want as many wins as possible. And they want to make it look sexy and easy and fun and carefree. And guess what, it’s not any of those things. It shouldn’t be hard work. Like, I am never going to tell somebody this is easy, like it’s not. And if it like some of it’s easy and fun, sharing your knowledge, putting your content together, seeing your students win and succeed. But you probably won’t be able to do any of those things. Well, if you’re just churning it out in two days without any thought or intentionality behind it, like, you could create an outline in two days. And then like I’ve told you before, start beta testing it, start gathering people to go through it, get their input, see if it’s helping see if it works, and then take a lot of money for it. Like, you’ve got to, you can’t shortcut the process. It’s just It doesn’t serve people. Well, it’s unethical. So that’s one thing I would say don’t do is don’t fall for the gimmicks don’t fall for people who say, passive income is so easy. Create your course in two days and then never work again. Like that’s such bullshit. That’s never gonna happen. Like, maybe one in a million. But are we one in a million? Probably not? I’m not I mean, I never think I’m the exception to the rule. I’m going to work twice as hard. And I’m going to be okay with it. Because at least I’ll be able to, again, sleep at night. Do you have anything on that before you say the one thing that you could do?

Akua Konadu
No, that was fired. That was so good. Let let everybody know, because that’s, that’s really true.

Laylee Emadi
I get so fired up about this, because it makes me so mad. I just I sit there and I look at it. And I’m like, listen, I used to be a teacher like an actual classroom teacher. Can you imagine if I created my curriculum in two days, my poor little students would have never learned anything.

Akua Konadu
Like, you wouldn’t have one as parents, some very upset parents.

Laylee Emadi
Luckily, like I please don’t ever come to me and say, Hey, I created and sold the course in two days, I’m going to look at it and be like, yeah, it looks that way. I’m not learning anything from it. Ma’am. So we’re three or whatever. So yeah, that’s definitely don’t do that. One piece of advice that I’ll say to do, you’ve already touched on. And that’s beta testing. And I don’t really care how you beta test it. But I do think it’s so important to get somebody’s eyes on the things that you’re teaching, before you start selling it for a couple of reasons. One, making sure that it makes sense to someone else, because sometimes as experts, and that’s the thing is like a lot of times we get imposter syndrome, we think like I don’t know everything, you probably know so much more than you think you know, which means you may be putting way too much into a product. And then the person who buys the product may not be able to understand it because it’s either too advanced, or it’s too late convoluted. And so you want to make sure that you have like a few people go through it and make sure that it works for them. And if it doesn’t make those changes before you, you know, like jack up the price and sell it because you want to make sure that ethically you’re creating the transformation that you’re promising the people who are buying from you. So test it out. Don’t do things in one day. Thanks.

Akua Konadu
Done, but to your point, yes, everybody when she told me the beta test, like I said before, I was kind of like, I really don’t want to do this, but it was the best decision ever. Because I got such great feedback for my service. And I made those changes and like I’m super confident now in what I sell, like I can I already know the results that people are gonna get, like, what any questions that people have, I can confidently answer it. So if you are somebody that’s wanting to make a product or service or whatever, like beta test it so this was so dang good. Like, I appreciate this so much. And so do you anything else? You want to share any words of encouragement? Like?

Laylee Emadi
Yeah, I would. I always love words of encouragement, especially on episodes. Like, I feel like I always do these episodes where I’m like, the queen of the unpopular opinion. And I’m like, everyone is lying to you. I don’t feel that way. I just want people to be careful. But my words of encouragement are, you know more than you think you do. Don’t let imposter syndrome stop you don’t let the fact that you feel like the market is oversaturated stop you. It is oversaturated with people who are maybe not quite as ethical as you are, and maybe they’re frauds and maybe you should step up and add in something that’s actually providing value for people. So that we, the ethical people that people have high morals can come out on top at the end of the day because people need what you have to offer. More than likely you know something that somebody else really wishes that they could learn. So don’t let the self doubt and the comparison and all of that like ugliness stop you from stepping up and, you know, morally and ethically creating some amazing content that people want to learn from you. Oh,

Akua Konadu
I love that. That’s so good and very encouraging. And even to add to that y’all like your hard work will pay off, especially like, with what you said, like lately, you’ve been in the game for 10 years now. Like, there’s no shortcuts, like do the work. It’s hard, but like, it’s definitely going to pay off, especially when you do things the right way. So I have really enjoyed this conversation. And I hope if you’re listening, you did too, because laylee is amazing. And so lately, where can people find you? You can

Laylee Emadi
find me at layleeemadi.com. And yes, it’s three E’s in a row because, man that name of mine, or over on Instagram laylee underscore emadi. Do people even hang out on Instagram anymore? I don’t know. I’ve everywhere laylee, underscore emadi. So yeah,

Akua Konadu
also check out her podcast. It’s awesome for all business tips share about your podcast really quick.

Laylee Emadi
Yeah, it’s oh my gosh, I love my podcast. It’s like my favorite thing. It’s called so here’s the thing was Laylee Emadi. We have just gotten into our we’ve been around three years, and we’re going strong, so come visit us over

Akua Konadu
there. Yes, of course. Well, thank you all so much for listening. I really hope you enjoyed this conversation. And until next time. Thank you so much for tuning into here’s the tea with a cooler. If you are loving the podcast, I’d be so honored if you go ahead and hit that subscribe button on your favorite podcast player and leave a review. This helps grow the podcast so more people can be impacted by the story shared by powerful guests like in today’s episode. Until next time, go make uncomfortable conversations a little more comfortable.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

SITE CREDITS | TERMS AND CONDITIONS

©2022 AKUA KONADU,LLC